A post-script to NRLC 44 and a look ahead to the crucially important November elections

 

Editor’s note. This editorial appears on page two of the July issue of National Right to Life News. The 36-page issue can be read in its entirety (and forwarded from) www.nrlc.org/uploads/NRLNews/NRLNewsJuly2014.pdf

HHSmandateThere is enough terrain to cover since the June issue of National Right to Life News that the July issue could be half-again as large. However any editorial overview would be remiss if we didn’t start with a few words about the jam-packed National Right to Life Convention which took place June 26-28 in Louisville.

We’ve devoted a lot of coverage to what more than one individual called the “best convention ever,” beginning on page 10. That includes three pages of beautiful photos, taken by Bill Molitor.

Bill neatly captured the joy and the enthusiasm and the earnestness of the audiences which filled not only the general sessions, the Prayer Breakfast, and the closing Banquet, but also the 64 workshops as well. Whatever the “perfect storm” in reverse might be, that’s what took place at the historic Galt House Hotel. Many, many good things came together to produce a memorable gathering of what Dr. Jean Garton calls “America’s pro-life family.” (See particularly, the stories on pages ten and sixteen.)

There were two Supreme Court cases which came down, one the Monday after the convention (the “Hobby Lobby” case). It is very important that you carefully read NRLC’s analysis which begins on page one.

No victory for religious conscience rights, however modest, is to be minimized. At this juncture we cannot know how aggressively the Obama administration will attempt to reverse that “setback.” But given this Administration’s hostility to religious liberties, we can only expect the worse.

Having said that, from our single-issue perspective, “the ruling does not truly correct any of the major abortion-expanding problems created by Obamacare,” as NRLC pointed out. For example, the Court’s ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby “comes nowhere near to correcting the heart of the problem,” which is the overly expansive authority that the Obamacare law itself provides to HHS to define “preventive services.”

Back in 2010 when the battle over Obamacare was hottest, National Right to Life reminded all parties that HHS could use its “preventive services” mandate to require that most employers also provide coverage for surgical abortions, or for doctor-prescribed suicide, that would be just as expansive as the contraceptive mandate issued by HHS. Nothing in the decision addressed that ominous prospect.

And, as NRLC also made clear, not even at issue before the High Court in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby were the other major abortion-expanding provisions of Obamacare. That would include the massive tax subsidies that will assist millions of Americans to purchase health plans that cover elective abortion.

“Only comprehensive legislative reform can cure the multiple abortion-expanding components of Obamacare – and such reform can only be accomplished with new leadership in the U.S. Senate and in the White House,” NRLC warned.

Which brings to mind pro-abortion Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (R-Nv.) and pro-abortion former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who is customarily listed as the #1 candidate (as of now) to be her party’s presidential nominee in 2016.

If you read the story on page 7, you can come away with only one conclusion. Senator Reid will say anything to try to keep pro-abortion Democrats in charge of the Senate. As POLITICO (which is highly sympathetic to Democrats) observed, Reid’s “unscripted attacks can veer into bellicosity and take liberties with facts.”

Reid is so over the top that his “attacks have drawn cries of McCarthyism from around the political world, including MSNBC host Joe Scarborough and Mother Jones editor Daniel Schulman.” His demagoguery is nothing new, it is just more obviously on display with Republican Senate prospects this fall looking bright.

Secretary Clinton (as we discuss on page 7) seemingly can’t stop stepping on her own tongue. Who could possibly have advised one-half of the ultimate power couple, whose net worth is probably in the hundreds of millions, to describe the Clintons’ condition as they left the White House as “dead broke,” indeed “in debt”? Or suggest it would be okay to get huffy when a sympathetic NPR type simply asks her to explain when and why Clinton changed her position on gay rights? Or fail to remind her the proper names of the major political parties in England, a huge gaffe. And so on and so on.

Chairman of the NRLC Board of Directors, Mrs. Geline B. Williams receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award from NRLC President, Carol Tobias and NRLC Executive Director, David N. O'Steen, Ph.D.

Chairman of the NRLC Board of Directors, Mrs. Geline B. Williams receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award from NRLC President, Carol Tobias and NRLC Executive Director, David N. O’Steen, Ph.D.

And we could talk further about President Obama’s plunging fortunes, building on the story on page 6. It was just a couple of weeks ago that the public rated him the worst President since World War II—and with good cause. People are catching on that (a) Obama gives every appearance of having checked out, more than two years before his second term ends, and (b) he simply is in over his head. But Obama’s fortunes have continued to sink, with absolutely no reason to believe he can turn things around. No wonder vulnerable Democrats are keeping him at arm’s length!

The July NRL News covers state developments (mostly good!), doctor-prescribed suicide (mostly awful) at the same time we keep track of what only be described as the increasingly bizarre comments coming from various wings of the pro-abortion Movement. You literally can’t make this stuff up.

Kentucky Right to Life Association Executive Director, Margie Montgomery receiving the Guardian Angel award at the 44th annual National Right to Life Convention held in Louisville, KY. Pictured here with Dr. Jack Willke and NRLC President, Carol Tobias.

Kentucky Right to Life Association Executive Director, Margie Montgomery receiving the Guardian Angel award at the 44th annual National Right to Life Convention held in Louisville, KY. Pictured here with Dr. Jack Willke and NRLC President, Carol Tobias.

To believe that you will embolden women to “speak up” about their abortion by videotaping your own abortion and putting it on YouTube? (See Emily Letts). Or reduce the inherent moral tension that is part of a life-and-death decision to a punch line in a movie whose “heroine” (Donna Stern) is a foul-mouthed comic with the moral maturity of a prepubescent whose idea of the ultimate punch line goes like this:

Stern is about to perform her comedy act the night before her abortion. Her friend Nellie tells her, “You are going to kill it out there.” Donna jokes back, “I’m actually going to do that tomorrow.”

Doubtless some people will find this humorous.

But fundamentally, this issue, like all editions of the “pro-life newspaper of record,” is built on hope, faith, and charity. We have hope that your kindness to women in crisis pregnancies will assist them in their hour of desperation to choose life. And for those women who have made a tragically wrong decision, we will be there to help them deal with the regret, the remorse, and the self-recriminations.

Kentucky Right to Life Association Executive Director, Margie Montgomery receiving the Guardian Angel award at the 44th annual National Right to Life Convention held in Louisville, KY. Pictured here with Dr. Jack Willke and NRLC President, Carol Tobias.

Kentucky Right to Life Association Executive Director, Margie Montgomery receiving the Guardian Angel award at the 44th annual National Right to Life Convention held in Louisville, KY. Pictured here with Dr. Jack Willke and NRLC President, Carol Tobias.

Those of us at National Right to Life, like you reading this editorial, have faith that the better angels of our nature will eventually win out. Why? Simply because abortion is intrinsically horrible, a wound on our consciences which can never be healed until we confront the evil.

And charity—love—even for those like Jenny Slate who played Donna Stern, and Emily Letts, whose moral confusion is as cavernously deep as it is profoundly sad. What can she possibly be thinking when she tells one reporter

“Yes, I do realize it was potential life. I have a special relationship with my ultrasound. People say it sounds weird, it’s my process. I realize it was potential life, and I love it in my own special way. I’m not glib and cavalier. I’m comfortable with my decisions.”

And then add later (in a post on the Cosmopolitan magazine website)

“I know that sounds weird, but to me, this was as birth-like as it could be. It will always be a special memory for me. I still have my sonogram, and if my apartment were to catch fire, it would be the first thing I’d grab.”

It may be too late for people like Slate and Letts, but perhaps not. Either way, we would never, could never give up trying to help cause the scales to fall from their eyes.

We owe that to those trapped in darkness and to all the little ones who lives we are pledged to try to save.