Renewing our culture one heart and one life at a time

By Maria V. Gallagher, Legislative Director, Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation

Editor’s note. This appeared in the December issue of National Right to Life News. Please read this and all the great stories in the issue. Please forward to your pro-life family and friends.

It does not matter how old I get, or how many mountains I have climbed in the course of my work. Whenever December rolls around, a feeling of excitement envelops me.

And I know I am not the only one who feels this way.

There is something uniquely special about the Christmas season and the impact it has on the world. As Christians prepare for the anniversary of the arrival of the Christ child, there is a great expectation—a belief that, somehow, some way, life will be better.

It is the one time of the year that much of the world is focused on a baby—a baby who would grow up to usher in a new era, one marked by a new dedication to love and to service of others.

Even those who do not share our faith can be swept up in the mystery and majesty of Christmas. The glistening lights…the rousing carols…the stirring manger scenes have a power to soften the hardest of hearts.

I am reminded of this line from that holiday favorite known as “A Christmas Carol” where Ebenezer Scrooge, the dastardly cold-hearted villain, re-discovers the joy of his youth after being visited by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come.

One line of that classic story states:

“For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child Himself.”

The child in all of us can relate to the child of the Christmas narrative. We realize that we started out as dependent infants who relied on our parents or caregivers for our survival. We identify with that vulnerability that defines childhood.

With each Christmas comes a renewed hope—that somehow, some way, life will improve–that we can be better, more compassionate people. That joy can truly co-exist—even overcome— the trials and tribulations of the world.

We may live in red states and blue states, but in the bliss of Christmas, everything appears golden. There is so much promise, so much possibility, with the recognition of Christ’s birth.

As advocates for life, we recognize the mighty struggles ahead. But we do so knowing that our culture can be renewed one heart and one life at a time.

Tremendous transformations are, indeed, possible. Witness the many abortion center workers who have not only left their death-dealing professions behind, but that have now embraced the pro-life cause.

As  Scrooge is transformed, he has faith that although “Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” his new-found humanity offers the hope that “But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change.”

Long after the last of the Christmas trees have been placed on the curb, I know that each one of you will do your part to keep hope alive.

For it is in that hope that precious children’s lives will be saved, mothers will be empowered, fathers will be honored, and families will thrive.

As Tiny Tim said, “God bless us, everyone!”