Women fear their aborted babies’ bodies may have been stored on notorious abortionist’s garage

By Dave Andrusko

Late abortionist Ulrich Klopfer

As NRL News Today reported earlier today, the list of authorities and officeholders, starting with the White House, who are demanding an investigation into how the remains of 2,246 aborted babies came to be stored on the property of a notorious Indiana abortionist continues to grow.

NBC Chicago’s Rick Callahan reported

Indiana’s attorney general said Monday that he will work with his Illinois counterpart to investigate what he called the “grisly discovery” of more than 2,000 medically preserved fetal remains at the Illinois home of a late doctor who performed abortions in Indiana.

Republican Attorney General Curtis Hill said he and Democratic Illinois Attorney General Kwame Raoul have “agreed to work together” as Hill’s office coordinates an investigation of the remains found at the home of Dr. Ulrich Klopfer, who died Sept. 3.

In an important second revelation, Callahan also reported

Hill’s announcement came after several Indiana lawmakers called for his office to investigate whether the remains were illegally transported across state lines. Lawmakers are also seeking a probe of the shuttered clinics in Allen, Lake and St. Joseph’s counties where Klopfer had performed abortions to make sure no fetal remains are being stored at the former clinics in Fort Wayne, Gary and South Bend.

Klopfer’s wife made the discovery last Friday when cleaning out the garage after her husband’s death. “She has no idea long how they had been there and no idea why he put them there,” said attorney Kevin Bolger. “Nobody knows.”

According to Chicago Tribune, Bolger “the garage was stacked ‘floor to ceiling’ and was not used by the woman at all.”

With all the attention properly being placed on the who/what/where/when/why of Klopfer’s bizarre storage of the bodies of unborn babies, what could easily get missed is what this is doing to women already wrestling with their decisions to have an abortion.

Karla Rodriquez posted a story Monday about one woman representative of women afraid their baby’s body may be included among those discovered at Klopfer’s rural home in Crete, Illinois: Trenevia Ivory.

She told Rodriquez that she underwent an abortion inside Klopfer’s now-closed clinic in South Bend when she was 17.

“A person that keeps human remains inside their home, especially that many as he had? We are all worried. We don’t know who’s babies it is,” said Ivory. “One of my biggest fears is that one of those babies was mine inside that garage.”

To be clear, it was only last Friday that the lawyer for Klopfer’s family told local authorities about the babies. So an investigation can only just now be starting.

But is impossible not to wonder—fear—what Klopfer was doing with those remains. As Mike Fichter, president of Indiana Right to Life, asked

  • Why were these babies preserved?
  • When and where did these babies die?
  • Were these babies being preserved in order to be sold to universities or research facilities?

Ivory said she is still “coping” to this day with the aftermath of her abortion. News of the discovery

brings back a lot of memories. For eleven years, I’ve been fighting depression disorder. I’m on medication now. Maybe three or four different types of medication,” said Ivory.

Right now, it is unclear what will happen with the babies’ remains. No doubt like many of the 30,000-50,000 women Klopfer aborted, Ivory wants to know the answer.

“I feel like I won’t get over it until I have closure. Until all of us have closure,” said Ivory.