The only difference between a baby who is born prematurely and a baby fighting for life after a botched abortion is location: the NICU

By Maria V. Gallagher, Legislative Director, Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation

It was one of those Facebook posts which breaks your heart. A young mother who had just given birth to twins found out that one of her newborn baby boys was in medical trouble.

He was flown to a distant children’s hospital where he could receive life-saving care. When his mother, father, and newborn brother arrived on the scene, doctors determined that the other twin needed to be admitted too. His mother was beside herself with anxiety and appealed for urgent prayer from her Facebook friends.

This story has a happy ending—both boys recovered and are now safely at home with their older siblings. But I found it ironic that this chain of events unfolded on social media at the very moment that pro-abortion Democrats in Congress were blocking legislation to protect newborn babies from infanticide.

In one part of the country, health care professionals feverishly work to save the lives of newborns. In Washington, D.C., political pols whose main allegiance appears to be to Planned Parenthood and NARAL work to unravel the legal safety net for babies.

This schizophrenic state of events strikes many people as decidedly strange. In America, where we uphold the rights of the vulnerable, why is it open season on babies who have just emerged from their mothers’ wombs? Why do we invest time and resources toward saving babies in Neo-Natal Intensive Care Units, while at the same time, in our nation’s capital, dismiss the humanity of babies deemed unworthy of life?

The only difference between a baby who is born prematurely and a baby fighting for life after a botched abortion is location. One is rushed to the NICU, the other is completely ignored, save (in the famous pro-infanticide words of Va. Gov. Ralph Northam) she be made “comfortable.”

The priceless value of both babies remains the same.

I was overwhelmed with emotion when I learned that, in Japan, a tiny baby who had been born at 24 weeks’ gestation, weighing the size of an onion, was finally coming home from the hospital. In addition to medical care, that boy had medical professionals who believed in him and his inherent worth.

That’s all any of us needs, really—someone to believe in us. If you are a baby born alive after an attempted abortion, it is clear that with a tiny handful of exceptions, Congressional Democrats do not believe in you.

At election time, the question should be, why should we believe in them?