Public confidence in media hits rock bottom

By Dave Andrusko

Just a very few words (many more are warranted but this is the last post of the week) about a poll from the belly of the professional journalism beast—the Columbia Journalism Review—which documented how confidence in the media has hit new depths.

“The survey, done in partnership with Reuters/Ipsos, interviewed 4,214 adults and found that the media is last on a list of all of Washington’s institutions that the public has confidence in,” reports Paul Bedard for the Washington Examiner.

The editors of CJR began their report with this very sobering observation:

“For decades, we’ve known that Americans don’t trust the press. What we haven’t known is how people view the makings of journalism, from the use of fact checkers and anonymous sources to the question of whether money skews journalistic decision-making. This new national poll for CJR answers those questions, and points to how big the trust gap remains.”

What makes this even more intriguing is this paragraph is the long and the short of the text. The “rest of the story,” to borrow from the late Paul Harvey, is told in a series of deeply troubling graphs.

To name just two

(1) While just 10 % of Republicans believe the media does not have a partisan bias, only 42% of Democrats believe the media does not have a partisan bias.

(2) 60% believe that sources pay reporters. Ouch!

See you Monday.