What goes ‘round, comes ‘round

By Jean Garton

Dr. Jean Garton

Dr. Jean Garton

There is hardly an action – no matter how revolting, immoral or violent – that doesn’t have defenders who will say, “But we can’t really judge others unless we’ve walked in their shoes” or who will go even further to charge those who refuse to agree that all things are relative with intolerant “judgmentalism.”

Other people go further still! They argue that some behavior that seems unloving to one person may actually be a loving act when someone else commits it.

Amazingly, one of the latest lines of defense of abortion is to go on the offensive: adopt that bizarre notion that the act of taking your unborn child’s life is really an act of love.

Some abortion providers now urge women to write love letters to their children before aborting them, simultaneously an act of co-opting criticism and ennobling the ignoble. One such form letter was published in a city newspaper and began with the words, “Dear Baby….”

“Dear Baby: I believe you will be better off in heaven. I am not sure I could provide you with a stable and healthy environment. I do not feel that emotionally or financially I could care for your every need.

“In forecasting my future, a dismal and grim picture is all that I can imagine. I hope you can understand my reasoning and can forgive me. I will see you in heaven. Love, Mom.”

Women are sometimes coerced into having an abortion to maintain the love of the father (who more often than not will abandon her after the child is dead). Others convince themselves that the abortion is done for the good of the baby, another act of love.

One thing is certain, however, is that it is an instructive act, behavior that sends a message.

For example, what lesson might other children in the family take away from that violent “solution”? As the years go by, what conclusions do they gradually come to, based on a decision made many years before?

Imagine that some sixty years have passed since their mother’s “loving” act of aborting a child. Now a sibling of that aborted child is writing a “love” letter of her own to their mother. It could go something like this:

“Dear Mom: I believe you will be better off in heaven. I am not sure I could provide you with a stable and healthy environment. I do not feel that emotionally or financially I could care for your every need.

“In forecasting my future, a dismal and grim picture is all that I can imagine. I hope you can understand my reasoning and can forgive me. I will see you in heaven. Love, your daughter.”

An impossible scenario? Not when you consider the growing trend to focus on end-of-life issues. Not when the elderly, the infirm, and the “non-productive” are increasingly viewed as living lives that are too costly.

Not when our population is living longer and longer. Not when euthanasia is becoming a popular discussion topic.

And surely not when you read story after story of spouses and children making the “loving” decision to “assist” grandma to commit suicide.

An abortion decision can be described as “desperate, thoughtless, selfish, or pressured .”

But never, ever call it “love.”

Editor’s note. This story appears in the April digital edition of National Right to Life News. You can read all of the issue at www.nrlc.org/uploads/NRLNews/NRLNewsApril2016.pdf. Please be sure to share stories with your pro-life family members and friends.