Spa-like abortion clinic spawns pro-abortion defenders

By Dave Andrusko

carafem30reWhen I wrote about Carafem–the goofy pro-abortion attempt to transform a trip to the abortion clinic into the equivalent of a relaxing trip to the spa–I knew that at the same time I was ridiculing the project, pro-abortion apologists would be citing Carafem as the next great leap forward for womankind.

In case you missed it, Christopher Purdy, President and CEO, bragged to the Washington Post’s Sandhya Somashekhar that Carafem is “fresh, it’s modern, it’s clean, it’s caring.” Melissa S. Grant, vice president of health services for Carafem, chimed in, “It was important for us to try to present an upgraded, almost spa-like feel.”

Indeed, reading about Carafem it does sound like something out of the abortionist industry’s version of Architectural Digest.

“The clinic will have wood floors and a natural wood tone on the walls that recalls high-end salons such as Aveda,” wrote Somashekhar (the Post’s “social change reporter”). “Appointments, offered evenings and weekends, can be booked online or via a 24-hour hotline.”

What a deal. Right after she books her quick chemical abortion (Carafem only performs chemical abortions), a woman could book a pizza online to be picked up at the closest pizza joint. (Maybe Carafem will offer a discount coupon.) Whether a quickie termination or a rush food order, nothing like speedy service and convenience.

Now even the professional abortion apologist knows this preposterous enterprise borders on self-parody–that the abortion industry will reveal itself to be every bit as cavalier, morally unserious, and casual about offing unborn children as pro-lifers accuse them of being.

But, not to worry. There’s always (and I do mean always) Amanda Marcotte.

Her particular gift, so to speak, is to strike back in direct proportion to the zaniness of the latest pro-abortion idiocy. The more foolish, the more self-condemnatory the proposal, the harder she attacks critics. Or should I say, the more illogically.

So, in this instance, Marcotte tells her readers at Slate.com that critics–including NRLC President Carol Tobias (who spoke to Somashekhar) –“want to tap into that unease”–a reference to the “roughly half” of Americans who “think abortion is morally wrong.” In the Post story

Tobias said she thinks people will be “disgusted” by Carafem, the spa-like abortion clinic.

“Abortion is not pleasant,” she said, “and trying to put pretty wrappings around the procedure isn’t going to make any difference.”

Okay, we can expect a grown up answer from Marcotte to a grown up sentiment that you don’t have to be a pro-lifer to hold, right?

”Well, cancer isn’t pleasant, either,” Marcotte responds,

but that’s not a reason to deny cancer patients fluffy robes and soothing music. Getting medical treatments in general is unpleasant. That’s exactly why health care providers should try to smooth the edges as much as possible with creature comforts. The same should go for abortion, a really common procedure that a woman runs a 1-in-3 chance of needing at some point in her life. Abortion is legal. If you want a little more misery and shame with your abortion experience, feel free to impose that on yourself, but for those who disagree, pass the fluffy robes and the herbal teas. 

Never mind the sophomoric cancer and abortion equivalency. Never mind that the “edges” smoothed off in a typical abortion are the arms and legs of a tiny human being. That’s the quality of thinking you expect from abortion apologists.

But “Pass the fluffy robes and the herbal teas.” If I wrote that sentence, I would doubtlessly be accused of making it up–of taking a cheap shot–because no abortion rights advocate would treat abortion that unseriously, that flippantly, that repugnantly.

Ah, yes she would. And proudly so.

Editor’s note. If you want to peruse stories all day long, either go directly to nationalrighttolifenews.org and/or follow me on Twitter at twitter.com/daveha.