Study examines men’s pivotal role in whether their partner aborts

By Dave Andrusko

Editor’s note. This appeared a year ago but its relevance is timeless.

A study of men by Lifeway Research released last week found that “Nearly four-in-10 men with either a girlfriend or a wife who had an abortion say they had the most influence on the decision to terminate the pregnancy,” according to Michael Gryboski.

Sponsored by Care Net, the study was of 1,000 men “who had a female partner get an abortion and knew of their significant other’s pregnancy before their baby was terminated.” In fact, three- quarters (74% ) of men reporting that their partner talked with them prior to having an abortion.

Lifeway reported that 38% of men said they had the most influence on the decision to abort. This was followed by 18% saying it was a medical professional and 14% saying it was the woman’s mother. “Only 4% said it was the abortion provider,” Gryboski wrote.

“In 2015, when we surveyed women who had an abortion, they indicated men were the most influential factor in their decision,” said Care Net CEO Roland Warren in a statement.

“Care Net recognized that despite this influence, the role of men had not yet been explored. This new study directly examines their feelings and experiences when the decision to have an abortion was made.”

The survey also found that 42% of men had either “strongly urged” or “suggested” that their female partner get an abortion, while 31% did not give her any advice. Only 8% said they “strongly urged” against having an abortion.

About 34% of respondents were married to the women who got an abortion, while 29% were “living together” and another 29% were “seeing each other.”

Lisa Hogan, executive director of the Sav-A-Life Vestavia pregnancy resource center in Alabama, told the Christian Post that her clinic has “worked very hard” to better include fathers.

“When a mom calls to make an appointment for a pregnancy test or an ultrasound, specifically if they are abortion-minded … we encourage them to bring the father of the baby to the appointment,” said Hogan.

“We have male advocates who are trained to meet with [the fathers], one-on-one, to have a conversation, to coach them through this, to give them a voice in the process.”

Hogan noted that her clinic sees around 1,000 fathers every year, telling them that “if she is pregnant, then they are already a dad.”  

“We know that if the dad is engaged, that we’re going to have a better outcome longterm in the life of the child,” she added.