Cars, elevators, telephones, and the abortion pill

By Sarah Terzo

Lawrence Lader

Longtime pro-abortion activist Lawrence Lader praises the abortion pill and talks about how it is one of the best inventions science has ever come up with:

“RU-486 [The abortion pill] presents a classic case of how scientific progress can revolutionize our lives. Within the last century, the railroad opened up Western America and became a major factor in turning the United States into an economic colossus. The elevator was essential to the development of the skyscraper, the vertical city, and the concentration of businesses and services in a unified geographic area. The automobile give us more than speed; it opened up the suburbs and the possibility of combining a rural or semi rural lifestyle with employment in the central city. The cathode ray tube made television possible. Antibiotics and other pioneering drugs extended our lifespan and improved the quality of these added years. But when it comes to making an impact on our personal relationships, the science of controlling human reproduction must be considered unique. No other development – not even the telephone, with its advantage of bringing families and friends together – as so drastically changed our lives….

“With the development of RU-486, scientific progress has reached a whole new stage.” [1]

So apparently, a pill that allows women to kill their unborn babies at home (which is an extremely painful and upsetting experience for them) is an invention on par with the telephone and the automobile. Perhaps a better comparison would be the guillotine and the electric chair.

From: Lawrence Lader, “RU-486: The Pill That Could End The Abortion Wars And Why American Women Don’t Have It,” (New York: Addison-Wesley, 1991), p.19.

Editor’s note. This appeared at ClinicQuotes and is reposted with permission. Lader’s book was published before the FDA allowed the use of RU-486 in the United States.