Told she’d miscarried, woman goes to second hospital and is told her baby is alive!

By Dave Andrusko

Photo Credit: Paul Edwards,The Sun

Photo Credit: Paul Edwards,The Sun

From an incredible high, to a heart-breaking low, and then a miraculous return to joy.

Elizabeth Stevens , 36, was early in her pregnancy when she received the shocking news from doctors at Royal London Hospital that she had lost her baby. Reporting for the Sun, Brittany Vonow wrote that with tears running down her face, Stevens called the baby’s father, Ian Fowler, to tell him about the tragedy.

“I just broke down over the phone to Ian,” she told Vonow. “I felt sick. I didn’t know what to do.”

“In a daze,” as Vonow described it, Ms. Stevens decided to have the baby’s body removed that very day. Those plans were thwarted, Vonow reported, when there was an emergency at the hospital. Stevens would have to wait five days.

Not wanting to wait, they visited a nearby hospital–Queen’s Hospital–“desperate for their torment to be over.” And then….

“Their world was turned upside down for the second time in 24 hours as medics heard a faint heartbeat – her baby was still alive,” Vonow wrote.

Surgeons at Queen’s told her she was bleeding not because she’d miscarried but because she had choriodecidual hematoma–the pooling of blood between the chorion (a membrane surrounding the embryo), and the uterine wall. Her baby was alive!

“’I was in shock,” Elizabeth told the Sun. “It’s a lot to take in, one doctor says it’s not fine, and the other one says it’s fine.”

On the one hand, the couple is overjoyed, “back on track planning for a life together with their child.” But, unsurprisingly, on the other hand, they want answers.

“How can they get it so completely wrong?” Mr. Fowler told The Sun Online on Wednesday.

Elizabeth told the Sun, “They nearly killed my unborn baby.”

“Royal London was about to remove a perfectly healthy baby.

“If the baby had been removed, they would have had a dead baby on the table.

“I was shocked, absolutely shocked. And I want an explanation.”

According to Vonow, Elizabeth and Ian are “in the process of making a complaint with Royal London Hospital.”

A spokeswoman for Barts Health NHS Trust said

“We sincerely apologise for the distress caused to Ms Stevens and her partner, and are fully looking into their concerns.

“When our investigation is complete we will invite Ms Stevens and her partner to meet with the clinical team to discuss our findings, and explain how we will implement any changes needed.”