Sanders and Clinton in statistical dead heat in California

By Dave Andrusko

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton

In the roughly 30 hours since we posted “What will California’s impact be on the Democratic Presidential campaign?”, things have gone from bad to worse for pro-abortion Hillary Clinton.

Not so long ago her lead over Democratic Socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders was well into double digits. Yesterday an NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll showed pro-abortion Sanders pulling within two points of Clinton in the California presidential primary among likely Democratic voters. (Sanders is actually ahead by a point among the wider electorate of all potential Democratic voters in California.)

But that’s just the surface–the tip–of the iceberg.

There I was on the treadmill this morning, watching CNN’s “New Day” with co-anchors Chris Cuomo and Alisyn Camerota as they interviewed New York Times columnist (and unyielding Clinton defender) Thomas Friedman.

Friedman is an apologist of the worst kind because of his transparent biases and fits of ill-logic. He was lamely trying to defend a column he’d written basically writing off all the substantive criticisms there are of the former Secretary of State.

The co-anchors were merciless, incredulous, and perhaps even embarrassed by the flimsiness of Friedman’s responses to their litany of Clinton “whoppers” (as Friedman liked to call them). Eventually, they all made up, but it was clear that they understood why Clinton polls so poorly in the trustworthiness category.

As we know, Clinton will accrue the last few remaining delegates she needs to secure the number needed to be the nominee, no matter what happens in California. Democrats use a proportional system, meaning a virtual tie would mean the state’s 475 delegates would be essentially split down the middle.

“But a Sanders victory in California — even by a small margin, and no matter how symbolic — could potentially give him justification to remain in the race heading into July’s Democratic convention in July, despite trailing in the delegate math,” according to NBC News’s First Read

Obviously, if we don’t do well in California, it will make our path much, much harder. No question about it,” Sanders said on “Meet the Press” last Sunday. “But I think we have a good chance to win in California, maybe win big, and maybe win four or five of the other states that [hold races] on June 7.”

What about Clinton’s favorability numbers? They remain abysmal. Cumulatively they are about the same they were a month ago–41% favorable to 55% unfavorable.

“Clinton’s ratings on trustworthiness were already woeful: A Fox News poll two weeks ago found just 31 percent of voters think Clinton is honest and trustworthy, while nearly two-thirds said they don’t think she is,” according to POLITICO.

“Among independents, nearly 80 percent don’t think she’s honest and trustworthy. Even among Democrats, a third don’t find her trustworthy.”