More repeat abortions and abortions to older women in England and Wales

By Dave Andrusko

Data released this week by the Department Health show more abortions to older women in England and Wales and an increase in repeat abortions and to women who already had at least one living child.

At the same time, rates were dropping for women under 20.

Here are some highlights from the report, which showed a less than 1% overall increase in the total number of abortions–from 184, 571 in 2014 to 185, 824 in 2015.

Most compare changes since 2005, others are stand-alone figures for 2015:

*As compared to 2005, in 2015, there was an 18% increase in the abortion rate for women ages 30-34. For women over 35, the increase from 2005 to 2015 was 15%.

*Overall, the repeat abortion percentage for women was 38%. In 2005, the figure was 32%.

* Referring just to 2015, 26% of women under 25 had experienced at least one prior abortion. But almost half (46%) of abortions procured by women over 25 were repeat abortions.

*In 2005, 47% of women who aborted already were mothers. By 2015 the percentage had jumped to 54%.

* In 2005, 47% of women had undergone an abortion or experienced a stillbirth (a very confusing combination). Ten years later the percentage had increased to 54%.

* There were 1,853 abortions to girls aged under 16 in 2015.

And then there is the figure for babies with disabilities, most commonly Down syndrome. The Mirror’s Jane Kirby reported:

The Don’t Screen Us Out campaign, a coalition of Down’s syndrome advocacy groups, said it was concerned by the rise in terminations for Down’s, from 662 in 2014 to 689 in 2015. It said these figures would rise with a new, more sensitive test for Down’s syndrome.

Lynn Murray, spokeswoman for the campaign, said: “As mother of a daughter who has Down’s syndrome it is deeply concerning to see that the number of abortions for Down’s syndrome have again increased.

“Sadly this is the tip of the iceberg – if the Government follows through on proposals to make these tests available on the NHS [National Health Service], their own projections show that there will be a steep increase in the numbers of children with Down’s syndrome screened out by termination.”