Pro-abortion Gloria Steinem: still crazy after all these years

By Dave Andrusko

Gloria Steinem being interviewed by Katie Couric.

Gloria Steinem being interviewed by Katie Couric.

After 50+ years of abortion advocacy, no one would expect Gloria Steinem to suddenly see the light. She is as firm in her commitment to abortion and you and I are to finding life-affirming solutions.

So I mention the “exclusive interview” she gave to Yahoo Global Anchor Katie Couric for two reasons. In reverse order of significance…

First, her new book is titled “My Life on the Road.” In the promotional blurb on Amazon, we read, “My Life on the Road is the moving, funny, and profound story of Gloria’s growth and also the growth of a revolutionary movement for equality—and the story of how surprising encounters on the road shaped both.”

Living “on the road” is apparently a solo act: that “growth” included aborting a child. Perhaps that’s why she “dedicates the book to the doctor who helped her get an abortion in 1957.”

Second, the teaser quote is the sentiment that baffles me to this day: “Every child has a right to be born loved and wanted. And a woman who decides that this is not the moment when she can provide that for a child is making, to me, a profoundly moral decision.”

It is the ultimate self-exculpatory excuse. The child is better off dead if not “born loved and wanted.” In short when a woman vacuums out the life within her or has her baby torn limb from limb using metal instruments she is really doing him or her a favor.

Some of the zanier breed of pro-abortion feminist would find this a complete cop out, which, of course, it is. To them it is irrelevant– literally beside the point–whether the child is wanted and/or loved.

Taking their baby’s life is an expression of autonomy, an exercise of brute force over someone who is utterly defenseless, a rather stark contradiction for a “feminist.” It will be done because it can be done.

Steinem never entertains the possibility that our capacity for love can and will emerge when we hold that baby in our arms. And that, whether the baby was “wanted” or not, she often becomes the very center of our lives.