Two abandoned newborns rescued, one from toilet, one from stroller

By Dave Andrusko

An image supplied by Beijing Tianqiao Police shows an officer holding the baby at the toilet on August 2, 2015.

An image supplied by Beijing Tianqiao Police shows an officer holding the baby at the toilet on August 2, 2015.

Two abandoned newborns, separated by thousands and thousands of miles, were rescued a day apart, one in China, one in Los Angeles.

On Sunday, police in western Beijing, China found a baby girl, face down in a public toilet. They were alerted by a construction worker who caught the rescue on film.

Police officer Qian Feng, first on the scene, told the Beijing Times that he saw the child’s feet in the toilet pipe before he got down on the ground to pull the baby out.

“The baby’s head was pointing downwards and her whole body had already fallen into the drain,” he told the Times. “We could only see the baby’s feet from the side.” A policeman “slid his hand into the pipe to gently pull her out,” the newspaper reported.

The baby is reported in stable condition as police search for her parents.

A newborn still attached to his umbilical cord and left alone in a stroller near a church in South Los Angeles was in good condition Wednesday morning at a hospital.  NBC4 News

A newborn still attached to his umbilical cord and left alone in a stroller near a church in South Los Angeles was in good condition Wednesday morning at a hospital. NBC4 News

In Los Angeles a homeless man spotted what he thought was an empty baby stroller on Monday night. Alex Diaz told police he returned later and saw the same stroller.

“Something in me told me to check in it. I moved the blanket and there he was, a newborn baby boy,” Diaz told NBC4. “He seemed weak, like he couldn’t even move no more.”

The newborn, his umbilical cord still attached, had been left for more than a day near a church in South Los Angeles. Dr. Marc Futernick told NBC4 the baby was ill and dehydrated after arriving at the Dignity Health California Hospital with a low sugar level.

“All of those things were quickly corrected by the medical team, and the baby is doing well,” said Futernick. “It’s certainly lucky, in the sense that the baby was found in time. But the baby was in a very dangerous situation.

California’s Safe Surrender law allows a mother to confidentially surrender a baby, without fear of prosecution, within 72 hours of birth.

“You can just drop the baby off at any fire station or hospital 24-7 and they will take care of the baby,” Futernick said. “It would be ideal to give a little bit of information about the pregnancy and any medical information there may be about the baby.”

Authorities are asking for the public’s help in identifying the baby boy’s mother.