The euthanasia slippery slope: a failure of memory and imagination

When the splash of assisted-suicide and euthanasia blinds us to their far-reaching ripples. By Margaret Somerville Editor’s note. My family and I will be on vacation through August 25. I will occasionally add new items but for the most part we will repost “the best of the best” — the stories our readers have told …

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Why euthanasia slippery slopes are inevitable

By Margaret Somerville Advocates of legalizing euthanasia reject “slippery slope” arguments as unfounded fear-mongering and claim that its use will always be restricted to rare cases of dying people with unrelievable, unbearable suffering. But, as the Netherlands and Belgium demonstrate, that’s not what results, in practice. The logical and practical slippery slopes are unavoidable and …

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Euthanasia: it’s a long, long, long way down

One way to get rid of slippery slopes is to deny that they exist By Margaret Somerville For a long time, it’s puzzled me how proponents of the legalization of euthanasia can confidently claim, as they do, that in the Netherlands and Belgium, the two jurisdictions with the longest experience of legalized euthanasia, there have …

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So you thought we’d reached the bottom of the Slippery Slope

By Dave Andrusko There are any number of components to the deaths of identical twins in Belgium–euthanized reportedly at their own request–that are puzzling, tragic, and deeply disturbing. Here are just five. As you recall, the unnamed 45-year-old brothers were born deaf, were told they would go blind, and (as many accounts described it) “chose …

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