“Zombie Law”? You Must Mean Roe v. Wade

By Right to Life of Michigan

Zombies are frightening. Even though they are dead inside, they keep shambling around the landscape, devouring the brains of unsuspecting victims, consuming the lives of millions in an apocalypse of Hollywood proportions.

Forget for a moment that it’s the abortion industry that wants to suck the brains out of children or sell them for science experiments.

The pro-abortion news website Rewire recently published an article about how the Democratic candidates for Michigan governor are committing to do everything in their power to make sure abortion remains totally legal and unregulated. The candidates promise they will repeal Michigan’s pre-Roe v. Wade “zombie law” that protects unborn children, if elected.

What is this “zombie law”? Since 1846, Michigan has legally protected the lives of unborn children. The most recent update of our law is from 1931. If Roe v. Wade is overturned, this law may have an opportunity to go back into effect.

Abortion supporters like the three Democratic candidates running for Michigan governor call this a “zombie law” because they somehow believe it’s already dead. Except that’s not true at all.

Just a few weeks before Roe v. Wade and its companion case Doe v. Bolton overturned the laws of all 50 states and forced abortion through all nine months of pregnancy for any reason on America—and the lives of more than 60 million innocent human beings—Michigan voters had a chance to vote on the “zombie law.”

Abortion supporters tried to repeal it through Proposal B of 1972, but 60% of Michiganders voted to keep our law.

Can you really call a law that got a supermajority of support last time it faced the voters “dead”? Can you call a law that’s actually still in legal effect “dead”? We don’t think so.

Roe v. Wade, however, is definitely a case befitting the walking dead. Only 13% of Americans believe abortion should be generally legal in the third trimester, but that’s law of the land because of Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton. That’s 87% of Americans who oppose its effects.

Roe v. Wade is legally indefensible. Even Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg can’t give you a legally-compelling reason to believe Roe v. Wade was decided correctly based on the law. Laurence Tribe, a well-known lawyer and abortion supporter, is forced to admit, “One of the most curious things about Roe is that, behind its own verbal smokescreen, the substantive judgment on which it rests is nowhere to be found.” (Harvard Law Review [1973])

Roe v. Wade has the outer husk of an actual judicial decision, but it is dead inside and dangerous to innocent lives. That’s much different than our state law, which is based on facts like the humanity of unborn children, and has received large public support.

Once you get past the verbal smokescreen of terms like “zombie law,” you can see where Democratic gubernatorial candidates Abdul El-Sayed, Shri Thanedar, and Gretchen Whitmer actually want to take Michigan. None of these extreme abortion positions featured in the Rewire article have broad popular support:

  • Forcing all hospitals to do abortions.
  • Removing waiting periods before abortions.
  • Forcing people to pay for abortions through their insurance plans.
  • “Prohibit government interference with physician-patient treatment programs or laws that place a burden on access to abortion,” i.e., repealing every prolife law on the books, from abortion clinic regulations to our state’s partial-birth abortion ban.

Think about that. These three candidates are demanding that women in the third trimester can walk straight into an abortion clinic and begin a partial-birth abortion that day. The child is birthed until only their head remains in the birth canal. The abortionist then stabs the child’s head, and sucks their brains out.

You will be forced to pay for this real act of zombie-esque violence. If you work in the medical field, you will be forced to participate. If something goes horribly wrong during the procedure, nothing will happen because the state won’t be regulating abortion clinics anymore.

Is that “women’s healthcare”? It’s not enough for these candidate to affirm Roe v. Wade and abortion through all nine months of pregnancy for any reason, they demand every popular, common-sense abortion regulation that’s been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court since 1973 be repealed.

Like a zombie, the abortion extremism of these three candidates refuses to stop. Their positions resemble something closer to Resident Evil than the opinions of most Michigan voters, and we eagerly await the opportunity to educate Michigan citizens about these on-the-record promises in the coming months.