Two veteran Democratic operatives leave jobs after uncover videos show them bragging about “a litany of political dirty tricks,” including voter fraud

By Dave Andrusko

Scott Foval

Scott Foval

Pro-life Donald Trump has come under withering attack for his insistence that the election is “rigged.” But even the Washington Post–after a lengthy discussion of why James O’Keefe had not earned reporters’ trust–ran a story today under the headline “Two Democratic operatives lose jobs after James O’Keefe sting.“

Here’s the lead

Scott Foval and Robert Creamer, two little-known but influential Democratic political operatives, have left their jobs after video investigations by James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas Action found them entertaining dark notions about how to win elections. Foval was laid off Monday by Americans United for Change, where he had been national field director; Creamer announced Tuesday night that he was “stepping back” from the work he was doing for the unified Democratic campaign for Hillary Clinton.

The moves came after 36 hours of coverage, led by conservative and social media, for O’Keefe’s video series “Rigging the Election.” In them, Foval is filmed telling hidden-camera-toting journalists about how they have disrupted Republican events. Foval also goes on at length about how an organization might cover up in-person voter fraud. In another Tuesday night statement, the Creamer-founded Democracy Partners, which used Foval as a contractor, denounced both Project Veritas and the statements caught on camera.

This is the lead in (“coverage, led by conservative and social media” and “hidden-camera-toting journalists”) to reporter David Weigel’s discursion into why O’Keefe’s work was not taken seriously by “legitimate news organization” such as, say, the Washington Post.

But then, Weigel tells us

The result of all that was that the “Rigging the Election” videos got a skeptical reception — at first. But the video of Foval, a Wisconsin-based politico with a long résumé, had him bragging about a litany of political dirty tricks. In the first video, he boasts of “conflict engagement in the lines of Trump rallies,” takes credit for the violence that canceled a Trump rally at the University of Illinois at Chicago, admits he has paid “mentally ill” people to start trouble and says there’s a “Pony Express” that keeps Democratic operatives in touch, regardless of whether they work for super PACs or the campaigns not permitted to coordinate with super PACs.

In the second video, Foval spends five minutes discussing how voters might be brought from outside Wisconsin to commit voter fraud, buying cars with Wisconsin plates to avoid looking suspicious. “We’ve been bussing people in to deal with you f—kin’ a–holes for 50 years, and we’re not going to stop now,” he says.

Robert Creamer

Robert Creamer

This would seem awfully devastating and supportive of what Trump has been saying. But Weigel does his best to pooh-pooh shocking claims of long-term systematic cheating and voter fraud.

For example, we’re told Foval “also seems to overhype his successes” and “the editing raises questions about what was said and what may come out later.”

Ponder that for a moment. A media establishment that will report and report and recycle and recycle damning allegations about Trump now suddenly has grown a conscience?

Please.