Colorado attempt to extend assisted suicide to those with disabilities

By Wesley J. Smith

Lance Wright, who is suffering with Parkinson's disease, talks about a proposal that he is advancing to allow him and other terminally ill patients to have the right to seek assistance from a third party when they want to die in Colorado. (David Zalubowski, Associated Press file)

Lance Wright, who is suffering with Parkinson’s disease, talks about a proposal that he is advancing to allow him and other terminally ill patients to have the right to seek assistance from a third party when they want to die in Colorado. (David Zalubowski, Associated Press file)

When people say assisted suicide is only for the terminally ill, I know they are either lying or ignorant of what the movement really wants.

If suicide or killing is an acceptable response to a terminal diagnosis, why not also for those who will suffer perhaps more and for a longer period? There is no logic to saying no once the initial premise is accepted.

An attempt to amend the Constitution of Colorado demonstrates the point.

From the Denver Post story:

Initiative 100, a proposed constitutional amendment, would allow people who have an incurable degenerative illness — such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or even kidney disease or diabetes — to hasten death.

The measure also would allow others to administer the drugs to those who could not do so themselves, which would extend the option to those who are physically disabled by their illness.

The only surprise here is the advocate showed his true face. Like I said, anyone who says assisted suicide is only for the dying is either lying or ignorant of what the movement really wants.

Editor’s note. This appeared on Wesley’s great blog.