Pro-abortion Pennsylvania legislators propose changes that would open the door to another “House of Horrors”

By Maria V. Gallagher, Legislative Director, Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation

It’s been said that those who do not study history are doomed to repeat it.

That frightening possibility is in play in Pennsylvania, where a group of pro-abortion state representatives is trying to repeal what could be called the Kermit Gosnell Law.

Gosnell was a West Philadelphia abortionist who, as a grand jury noted, “killed babies and endangered women.”

The grand jury report summed up his crime spree this way:

“What we mean is that he regularly and illegally delivered live, viable, babies in the third trimester of pregnancy – and then murdered these newborns by severing their spinal cords with scissors. The medical practice by which he carried out this business was a filthy fraud in which he overdosed his patients with dangerous drugs, spread venereal disease among them with infected instruments, perforated their wombs and bowels – and, on at least two occasions, caused their deaths.  Over the years, many people came to know that something was going on here.  But no one put a stop to it.”

In response to their alarming findings, the grand jury—which was made up of people who held vastly different views on abortion—recommended that the Pennsylvania Department of Health license abortion centers as ambulatory surgical facilities. The law based on those recommendations became Act 122 of 2011.

As the law states, in part:

“The General Assembly finds and declares as follows:

(1)     A Philadelphia County investigating grand jury report has revealed systemic deficiencies in the manner in which the Commonwealth has regulated abortion facilities operating in this Commonwealth.

(2)     These systemic deficiencies have led to horrific instances of bodily injury and death.

(3)     Surgical abortions are at a minimum an outpatient surgical procedure performed in this Commonwealth.

(4)     The general public has a substantial interest in the comprehensive regulation of abortion facilities operating in this Commonwealth…”

After the law went into effect, in one noteworthy case, the Hillcrest abortion facility in Harrisburg racked up 44 pages worth of health and safety violations following an inspection. The facility ultimately gave up its abortion license and is now closed.

Now is not the time to compromise on women’s health and safety. Pennsylvania tried to cut corners before—and women were endangered as a result.

Action Item: Please contact Pennsylvania’s state lawmakers and urge them not to repeal the Commonwealth’s common sense abortion center regulation law.

You can send an immediate message to state lawmakers by clicking here.