Why the pro-abortion Guttmacher Institute says that “2022 is shaping up to be even more devastating for abortion rights and access” than 2021

By Dave Andrusko

Two abortion laws, one in Mississippi, the other in Texas, have the abortion lobby and its defenders in panic-mode. Let’s remind ourselves why.

Mississippi’s “Gestational Age Act,” heard by the Supreme Court on December 1, would protect unborn children beginning at the end of the 15th week. It is one model for other legislatures. Some such as Florida’s legislature have passed it and then sent it on to the governor to sign. Others such as Arizona and Kentucky at a different stage.

Texas’s SB 8, the Heartbeat Law, set another example for other states to follow. Under SB 8, abortions may not be performed after the unborn child’s heartbeat is detectable – generally around the sixth week of pregnancy.  Other states have introduced similar bills, such as Idaho, Louisiana, and New Hampshire.

While these laws by far have grabbed the most attention, the pro-abortion Guttmacher Institute puts the breadth and depth of the pro-life efforts in a wider context. According to Guttmacher’s Elizabeth Nash, Lauren Cross, and Joerg Dreweke

With the fate of Roe v. Wade hanging in the balance at the US Supreme Court, 2022 is shaping up to be even more devastating for abortion rights and access. Already, a number of state bills have grabbed headlines for proposing outrageous and shocking abortion restrictions.

From the beginning of the year through the middle of March

So far this year, 1,844 total provisions related to sexual and reproductive health and rights have been introduced across 46 states and the District of Columbia. This includes both restrictions and proactive measures.

These include “trigger laws,” which take effect when the Supreme Court overturns Roe and abortion laws will be the province of the states.

The other major initiatives are medication (chemical) abortions. Guttmacher breaks these out into

  * Bans use of medication abortion 

  * Prohibits mailing of abortion pills 

   *Restricts administration to physicians 

While there are loads of speculation, no one knows what the Supreme Court will rule this summer in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. What we do know is that pro-lifers will continue to pass laws that protect both mother and child.