Prior to Roe, 100 OB/GYNs Expressed Doubts About Abortion

By Sarah Terzo

Editor’s note. It’s just 16 days until the 49th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. We’ve posted new and reposted older stories about this traumatic moment in our nation’s history.

In 1972, the year before Roe v. Wade, 100 OB/GYN’s published an article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. They expressed doubts about the legalization of abortion. Concerned that women may want surgery that is not in their best interest, they said the following:

“For the first time, except perhaps for cosmetic surgery, doctors will be expected to do an operation simply because the patient asks that it be done.”

“A Statement on Abortion by One Hundred Professors of Obstetrics.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 112 (1972) pp. 992 – 98.

They realized that the doctor would be a mere technician, performing a service that women wanted without knowing their in-depth medical history or life circumstances. Perhaps these doctors envisioned clinics where women would wait in line and be aborted one after the other with the doctor only seeing his patients for several minutes on the operating table.

Is this really conducive to good medical care?

Editor’s note. This appeared at Clinic Quotes and is reposted with permission. Sarah Terzo is offering a short, free pro-life eBook that exposes the pro-choice movement. Click here to get it.