Imagine “savoring” the deaths of 67 unborn babies in just 17 hours

By Dave Andrusko

It’s at moments like the last two days that the chasm between pro-lifers and pro-abortionists is most vividly revealed.

I am not talking about the over-the-top reaction to the Supreme Court’s rejection of the pro-abortionists’ request to stop the Texas Heartbeat Act in its track. What else would you expect? Any chink in the armor means some—maybe thousands—of babies will escape the abortionist’s scalpel, curette, scissors, or forceps.

Instead I am referring to the frenzy of killing that took place inside one Texas abortion clinic before SB 8 took effect. And the pride and sense of satisfaction the staff took in meeting “impossible” goals.

The headline begins “67 abortions in 17 hours.”

Over the years I’ve read many disturbing accounts. But in its race to the bottom, this story, written by Chabeli Carrazana, may be at the top of the list.

Whole Woman’s Health in Fort Worth is described as “one of the largest abortion care clinics in the state.” Carrazana’s account reads like the evacuation of Dunkirk in reverse. Instead of saving lives in order to fight another day, it’s mad dash to kill, kill, and kill some more.

Instead of leaving no one behind, the goal on Tuesday was to leave no unwanted baby left alive.

Marva Sadler, the director of clinical services, addresses the “team” –“eight people total between the techs and the front office staff, the doctor and three staff members from a nearby clinic they brought in to help”–and tells them to take a breath:

“We are not the bad guys here,” she told them. “We are doing everything right and we’re going to help everybody that we can. If there’s someone that we can’t help, it’s not our fault.” 

By “help,” Sadler means snuffing out an unborn child’s life—as many as possible as efficiently as possible. They had to because they’d established some mighty big goals. “They needed to perform eight abortions an hour with only one doctor on duty, an octogenarian who had been working since 7 a.m. 

“It felt impossible.”

But, not to worry. The killing machine is at its best when time is short.

Just before SB 8 took effect, at 11:56 p.m., the doctor walked out of his last procedure. Clinic workers got to everyone they were legally allowed to treat. In 17 hours, they’d performed 67 abortion procedures. They’d seen 60 people who had taken medication to abort at home to confirm that — yes, the process was complete, and they wouldn’t be left in limbo. 

Can you believe the dedication? Chabeli Carrazana continues

For a moment they were able to savor it. Sadler looked at the doctor and told him physicians half his age wouldn’t have been able to do what he did. Even if he only had performed one abortion, it would have been a victory, she said.

“Savor”?

Even if the elderly abortionist had been able to annihilate only one baby, “it would have been a victory.”

A victory for what? 

All of this was exhausting work. And, starting Wednesday, the “team” wouldn’t be able to “care” for women:

“Sadler knew she would have to go out and say something uplifting to her team, even as she knew this would be a day where she would have to deny people care. 

The subhead for the story reads, “At Whole Woman’s Health in Fort Worth, it was a race to perform as many abortions as possible until midnight, when a new Texas ban on the procedure became law.”

Imagine going home and “savoring” being a party to having helped obliterated the lives of 67 babies in 17 hours.

The chasm just grows wider and wider, deeper and deeper.