Washington Post explanation of why Democrats’ future is cloudy falls way short

By Dave Andrusko

If you are a pro-abortion Democrat media outlet, devoted to promoting the demise of the pro-life Republican party, how do you square this circle?

You’ve announced ad nauseam that pro-life policies, proposed and/or enacted, are not supported by the public. In fact, whether it is parental notice or banning abortion when your helpless victim will suffer unimaginable pain, any and all policies are, you blather, “extreme.”

If so, why are the same outlets glumly announcing (a) that states are passing pro-life measures right and left and (b) the Supreme Court has agreed to hear Mississippi’s law which bans abortions after 15 weeks? Clearly, these proposals are mainstream and reflect the larger public’s view that there needs to be sharp limitations on the unlimited “right” to abortion.

Worse yet, from the perspective of these appendages to the Democrat party, the future looks increasingly grim—above and beyond what the justices might do in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization.

For example, to the shock of virtually the entire Media Establishment, Democrats did not gain seats in the House of Representatives in 2020 but rather lost almost all of their numerical advantage. And  going forward (as the likes of the Washington Post lament),” House Republicans have two critical advantages in 2022.”

What are they, according to David Byler?

The Republicans’ first advantage: The other party holds the White House. If Biden follows the path of other recent presidents, he’ll spend political capital, navigate crises — and lose supporters in the process.

That is absolutely true. In the off-year election, the average loss in the House for the party that holds the White House is 27 seats. 

But this not just the result of the crises that every President faces. In this case it is a President who gives every sign he is not up to the job. When he occasionally escapes the cocoon his handlers have spun around him, it has not been a pretty sight.

The other advantage, Byler writes,

In most states, the state legislature is in charge of redrawing congressional districts every decade. So in 2020, when the GOP gained full control of the legislature in 30 states, they won line-drawing power. According to FiveThirtyEight’s count, Republicans will control the redrawing in 187 districts in 2021, bipartisan and independent commissions 167, and Democrats only 75.

Just to be clear, if Democrats had fared better in the states, they would have had an advantage in redrawing district lines. To quote President Obama in 2010, “Elections have consequences, you lost, get over it.” Or, put another way, “politics ain’t beanbag.”

This in addition to the impact of President Biden’s slumping approval ratings. In spite of slavishly favorable coverage, his approval is down to 48%, according to the latest Monmouth Poll, and only 36% among Independents. 

Obviously, he hopes to rally, but given how genuinely radical the Democrat party is on abortion and most every other contentious issue, this is highly unlikely.