Pope Francis defends the unborn as his native Argentina considers legalizing abortion

By Dave Andrusko

Many may know that Pope Francis was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and became its archbishop in1998. So, it’s fair to assume, that moves to “liberalize” abortion in his native country may have a special meaning to the Pontiff.

The Crux is an independent publication that provides invaluable news about the Vatican and the Catholic Church. Yesterday Inés San Martín posted an article under the headline, “Pope Francis once again enters abortion debate in Argentina.”

Her account is nothing short of fascinating.

San Martin gives her readers the context:

President Alberto Fernandez introduced a bill in November to make abortion “legal, free, and safe,” across the nation.

Before we get to Pope Francis’s sterling remarks in defense of the unborn, I want to quote Gines Gonzales Garcia, the country’s health minister, whom San Martin describes as “one of the biggest proponents of the bill.” From her story:

During his remarks on Tuesday, he called abortion a “public health issue,” and said what’s being debated is if terminations are performed “safely or clandestinely.”

“Here there are not two lives as some say,” the health minister said, making reference to the slogan of the pro-life campaign in Argentina. “There’s clearly a single person and the other [thing] is a phenomenon. If it were not like that, we would be facing the greatest universal genocide, [because] more than half the civilized world allows it.”

The unborn, to this “health minister,” is a “phenomenon”? The unborn child is, indeed, phenomenal, in the best possible way, just as Gonzales Garcia’s ethical and medical conclusions are phenomenal, in the worst possible way.

But it’s easy to understand why Gonzales Garcia has to discard the preborn’s importance, indeed even his or her very existence. To acknowledge otherwise is to admit we are slaughtering 40 to 50 million human beings worldwide each and every year—which Gonzales Garcia concedes would be “the greatest universal genocide.”

Contrast that with Pope Francis’s assurances in a private letter to Argentina Father Pepe Di Paola, a priest he has known for decades. 

From San Martin’s story:

“For me the deformation in the understanding of abortion is born mainly in considering it a religious issue,” said the private letter from Francis to Father Pepe Di Paola.

“The issue of abortion is not essentially religious. It is a human problem prior to any religious option,” the letter continued. “The abortion issue must be addressed scientifically.”

The priest noted that “scientifically” was underlined by the pope.

“Francis emphasizes this to me because he maintains that many believe that ‘no to abortion’ is rooted in an opinion and not science,” Di Paola said.

Fr. Di Paola shared the Pope’s remarks as he spoke “via live stream at congressional session debating legalizing abortion in the South American country.”

Should abortion be legalized in Argentina, Fr. Di Paola, who works with the poor in the slums of Buenos Aires, warned that the next step is “the elimination of the elderly disguised with the euphemism of a dignified death, ‘consummating the exclusion of the weakest.”

“Deputies and senators: don’t put yourself in God’s place, let science speak seriously, rule for the poor and not for the enlightened capitalist elites, Di Paola said. “Let us all make a country where life is loved, a country where the Pope can feel comfortable when he decides to come.”