“Forever Now,” a song about fathers, children, and unconditional love

By Dave Andrusko

Usually earlier, but no later than December 1, I begin listening to Christmas music. So it was that on Tuesday, I pulled out a variety of CDs and began playing them to and from work. 

One of my contemporary favorites is Michael Bublé. Alas, it wasn’t until later in the day that I learned he had performed on the ‘The Disney Holiday Singalong’ which had aired November 30.

So I went to his website and watched him sing, “It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas.” Joining Michael was his wife, Luisana,  and their three children–Noah BubléVida Amber Betty Bublé, and Elias Bublé.

Watching him perform, it reminded me of something I’d written about him a couple of years back. 

While perhaps not a household name, Bublé’s familiarity means he is close to it. Equally familiar (to many people, at least) is the story of his two years away from the music industry to spend time with his family. 

Noah, their then-five year old son, was battling stomach cancer, Now, thankfully, his cancer is in remission.

A friend had forwarded me “Forever Now,” which was part of Bublé‘s then just released album. 

Without getting too gushy, “Forever Now” is a tender love song from a dad to his child who already is getting too big to want to hold his old man’s hand. It’s been decades since my son wanted to hold my hand, but I instantly recognized the feeling.

There are so many keen insights into being a parent. Bublé sings of the all-too-rapid passage of time, a father’s love that remains steadfast come what may (aka no matter what wayward paths his child may take), and a promise (unlikely to be kept, try as we might) “I’m never gonna let you down.”

The song begins with the first time his child opened their eyes, “And I recognized your face.” In the first stanza and throughout, Bublé vows to protect his child, to “keep you safe.”

This is not a story about abortion. But it is most definitely about this child’s—any child’s—infinite possibilities and our obligations as parents to them.

Put another way, we shouldn’t have to wait to see our child open their eyes to be fiercely protective. We shouldn’t have to wait to hold their hand to “have your back.” Nor should we need a guarantee that our unborn child is perfect to be “forever proud of you” or hold our “forever” love in abeyance until we can actually see the little one.

Take three minutes out and listen to “Forever Now.”

You’ll be glad you did.