Fox rejects Super Bowl ad showing “The Face of Choice”

By Dave Andrusko

Each year, it seems, Super Bowl advertising becomes more risqué and paradoxically more P.C. Among the ads that you would not have seen—because Fox refused to air it—was a 30 second ad about abortion survivors.

Oh, because they mentioned the “A” word (abortion), right? No, the word was conspicuous by its absence. The ad showed one child, four women, and two men who represented “the face of choice” and “the survivors of choice.”

The questions posed are as powerful as they are brief. The child asks, “Can you look me in the eye,” before the ad immediately segues to a man who asks, “Can you look me in the eye and tell me I shouldn’t be alive?” A woman (whose story goes back to the 1950s), then inquires, “Can you tell me that I didn’t deserve to survive?”

The pro-abortion response to the latter is, “Of course, I can! You didn’t deserve to survive. You were supposed to be dead. Nothing is owed you, certainly not the care a baby of a similar age born in the normal fashion would receive. She was wanted alive. You were wanted dead.”

But it is that very first question that sends a chill up your spine. The child asks, “Can you look me in the eye?”

“No, I don’t have to,” you can imagine an honest pro-abortionist responding. “So I won’t. You’re not going to haunt my dreams.”

Melissa Ohden is the founder and director of the Abortion Survivors Network, an annual guest at the National Right to Life Convention, and a regular contributor to NRL News Today. Melissa’s testimony and that of an ever-growing community of abortion survivors, flies in the face of the anti-life assurances that babies don’t survive abortions.

They do, and as states such as New York pass legislation allowing abortion up until birth, more babies will survive. What was once called “The Dreaded Complication” can today more accurately be described as “The Anticipated Complication.”

Like everything and everyone else that runs up against the abortion lobby’s insistence lust for a limitless license to kill, abortion survivors always anticipated a wall of denial.

But that wall is crumbling, the story of one abortion survivor at a time.