Aborted woman offers Top Ten Hints how to secure an abortion during the holidays

By Dave Andrusko

Almost exactly four years ago, I wrote a post titled, “Death never takes a holiday for Planned Parenthood.” It was inspired, so to speak, by a grateful PPFA tweet, thanking the creator and head writer of the television show “Scandal” for showing—in all its-matter-of-factness—an abortion.

But not just any abortion, rather an abortion wrapped in a profane package with a blasphemous ribbon on top. Here’s how Newsbusters’ Alexa Moutevelis Coombs explained a scene where there was no dialogue, only music:

The entire hour was an advertisement for Planned Parenthood, but the absolute worst scene was a montage set to the Christmas hymn “Silent Night,” a song that celebrates the birth of Christ, while main character Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) has an abortion, killing her and the president’s baby. …

The final scene of the winter finale is of Olivia sitting down, relishing the glass of wine she can now drink, smiling at her Christmas tree, while “Ave Maria” plays.

Which brings us to “What to do If you Need an Abortion Over the Holidays.” It appears, of course, at Rewire News. Paige Alexandria helpfully offers “[T]en tips to keep in mind to access abortion when availability might be limited.”

The post includes a graphic containing the moral of the story (so to speak):

And while it was discouraging at times, I don’t associate the holidays with any grief around the decision. Instead, it was the first time I learned what it really meant to be pro-choice.

Meaning….what? See below.

Most of the “tips” are commonsense responses to addressing the “problem”: “With the holidays approaching, ‘tis the season for limited availability at local abortion clinics.”

#3 particularly struck me—“Call the clinic multiple times a day for cancellations.” Another woman’s heart may have soften. At the last minute, she may have rethought the decision to end her child’s life, perhaps, just perhaps, prompted by thoughts of annihilating a hapless child at the time when countless Christians are commemorating and celebrating the birth of Jesus.

But her “choice” not to kill is your lucky day. You won’t have to wait. Oh, Joy and rapture, so to speak.

#5 speaks volumes as well. Ask friends and relatives for money rather than a gift. “You don’t have to share the reasoning behind it,” Alexandria assures her readers, “and it’s perfectly acceptable to simply say you have bills to pay.” No need to tell them their money is helping to obliterate a niece/nephew or grandchild.

How about #8? “Visit storytelling websites that highlight the real experiences of people needing an abortion. There’s an entire community dedicated to busting stigma and normalizing abortion.” Ah, yes, an entire “community” dedicated to telling you that sucking out your child or dismembering her is just meeting a “need.”

Here is Alexandria’s conclusion:

Even though it was hard, when I look back on my experience during the holiday season, I remember feeling empowered. I advocated for myself by calling clinics and abortion funds, and comparing the costs and availability gave me a sense of control in a situation where I felt powerless. And while it was discouraging at times, I don’t associate the holidays with any grief around the decision. Instead, it was the first time I learned what it really meant to be pro-choice. Abortion may be legal, but without access that means nothing—and this isn’t only true for where we need an abortion, but also when. I hope these tips help you, or help someone you love, access abortion where and when you need it.

Regrets? Naw. Grief? Nope. Discouragement? Only that it took time and effort to “control” the situation.

To the pro-abortion mind, these ten “tips” will “help someone you love.”

The only thing missing in Alexandria’s Top Ten list is what holiday music to play while the abortionist is carving up your child.