The abortionist’s self-image polished by a compliant, adoring reporter

By Dave Andrusko

Last week we reposted a story from Texas Right to Life that was so stunning I knew I had to write a follow-up.

The story from Texas RTL contrasted abortionist Marva Sadler with an unnamed itinerant abortionist. (They prefer the moniker “independent abortion provider.”)

The portrait Sadler penned in an op-ed for Colorlines of herself and other itinerant abortionists is of an indispensable community asset. A “big part” of their job “is meeting people where they are, making them feel supported in their decision and ensuring that they experience health care with dignity. The love and dignity that I bring to my work is reflected by independent abortion providers across the country.”

To me Sadler’s self-serving self-image in “Guided by Love, Abortion Care Providers Are Voices For Their Communities” resembles nothing so much as the self-portrait painted by abortionist Kermit Gosnell. Gosnell also saw [sees] himself as a kind of civil rights activist, serving a necessary function for communities of color.

Whatever accuracy Sadler’s gauzy, kumbaya likeness conveys is purely by accident. A much more honest representation is found in a Los Angeles Times story that is as long as it is flattering.

To be sure this long, long profile of the unnamed abortionist reinforces the meme of selfless crusader. But the mercenary aspects of the free-lance abortionist and the slaughterhouse-like qualities of the assembly line killing seeps out no matter how fawning Soumya Karlamangla’s depiction may be.

Here are three illustrations from “60 hours, 50 abortions: A California doctor’s monthly commute to a Texas clinic.”

*Unsurprisingly, states that are more pro-life have far fewer abortionists than, say, California, where the subject of Karlamangla’s profile resides. They are “spread unevenly across the country.”

“Some states have very few physicians willing to provide abortions. In California’s Bay Area, by contrast, there are so many physicians who want to do abortions that many can’t find work in the region.”

Can’t find work. Ponder that for a moment.

*”The young doctor will spend 60 hours in Dallas this trip and perform 50 abortions. She will have to run in the hallways to keep up with her packed schedule.” We are supposed to be impressed by her dedication, and (by the way) by the way she undermines the message she is required by the state of Texas to deliver to abortion-minded women. Racing back and forth to end massive numbers of lives doesn’t impress me as a proper use of a doctor’s skills and unique position.

*Aside from a couple of paragraphs Karlamangla allows to peaceful protestors, it’d be difficult to understand why anybody gets upset. What’s the big deal? “The [chemical] abortion involves no cutting or surgery,” Karlamangla writes. “The doctor explains that an early pregnancy is simply ‘a clump of cells.’ When she looks at what she has removed from the patient’s uterus floating in a glass dish, she sees a piece of yellowish-red tissue smaller than her little finger.”

Is a little “yellowish-red tissue” worth all this commotion? Not to Karlamangla and the abortionists.

*The abortionist is just regular folks. “She has settled into what she describes as an almost stereotypical California lifestyle; she hikes year-round, recently completed a 100-mile bicycle ride and co-parents her best friends’ daughter. She is surrounded by doctor friends who support her work, a community she is reluctant to give up.” Heck, she “states on her online dating profile that she is an abortion provider, considering it an essential part of who she is.”

What kind of guy (a) would want to date an abortionist, and/or (b) would want to date an abortionist who feels compelled to tell the world she disposes of “pieces of yellowish-red tissue” for a living?

Contra Karlamangla, abortion is ugly and bloody, a hideously wrong turn taken when the unfamiliar road ahead seems to stretch out beyond a woman’s capacity to see or to comprehend. It is a disastrously wrong decision which we attempt to help vulnerable women to avoid and, should that fail, hold their hand and help them find solace and healing.

If you think about it, the perimeter surrounding the “right” to abortion is patrolled by forces armed with deceit, desperation, and disinformation.

The best way to breach those defenses? With education wrapped in compassion and concern for both mother and child.