North Carolina legislature moving ahead on bill to protect abortion survivors

By Dave Andrusko

As I started to write this post about legislation in North Carolina, I ran across a story at the pro-abortion site rewire.com. It was written by the same woman who openly questioned whether a newborn at 30 days qualifies as a legal “person.” Naturally Calla Hales insisted she was a misunderstood victim, the conclusion to her story which ran under the propaganda-drenched headline, “‘Born Alive’ Abortion Bills Are Based on Nothing But Propaganda.”

So what is the North Carolina measure? It is one of a series of proposals, in Congress and in states, which declare unequivocally that abortionists may not discriminate against abortion survivors. These babies are to receive the same level of care that any other baby of a similar gestation age receives—no more, but no less.

Last week committee in the House and Senate passed identical bills.

The House Health Committee vote was 20-9. The Senate Judiciary Committee vote was

According to the Associated Press’s Gary R. Robertson

The response from the local abortion industry is the same as you read in other states or from Democrats in the United States Senate or House:

“The legislation is not aimed at treating a problem that exists,” said Kelsea McLain with A Woman’s Choice of Raleigh, which provides abortions. “Rather it’s aimed at creating inflammatory rhetoric around abortion rights and access to further stigmatize our rights.”

The only thing the bill would “stigmatize” is discriminatory non-treatment of babies who survivor abortion.

The legislation is designed so that babies born alive “whether it be through an abortion or through the actual childbirth, that they are treated the same, with the same care that any medical person would give to a naturally born baby,” Rep. Pat McElraft, a Carteret County Republican, told the House Health Committee.

Social conservatives aligned with North Carolina Republicans won more political clashes over abortion on Thursday, as committees approved legislation addressing newborn care should the procedure result in a live birth.

Identical House and Senate bills, one of which could receive a floor vote as soon as next week, require physicians and nurses to care for children born alive after the procedure. They could face a felony and active prison time if they don’t, along with potentially $250,000 fines and other monetary damages.

The legislation is designed so that babies born alive “whether it be through an abortion or through the actual childbirth, that they are treated the same, with the same care that any medical person would give to a naturally born baby,” Rep. Pat McElraft, a Carteret County Republican, told the House Health Committee.