Thanks to pro-lifers, closed abortion facility becomes free medical clinic

By Cassy Fiano

Two years ago, Amethyst Women’s Center in Virginia closed after being open for over 20 years. Why it closed is not clear, but what is known is that the abortion facility had racked up 48 pages of health violations.

The facility was frequently kept in filthy condition, including soiled linens and recliners not being cleaned between patients. Staffers were also caught not changing gloves between patients. Several abortions are known to have been botched there.

Those who work in the abortion industry claim that they are providing vital health care to women, but the reality is, they’re just dealing in the deaths of countless preborn children — and along the way, many women are butchered, too. Planned Parenthood is particularly notorious for boasting of its health care services for women, all while the organization’s legitimate health services are declining along with its patient numbers. Abortions, however, are increasing at the abortion corporation.

But thankfully, with this Virginia abortion facility’s closure, pro-lifers have stepped forward to provide actual health care for low-income residents. The facility has been turned into a free medical clinic for the poor.

This month, the Mother of Mercy Free Medical Clinic opened. Staffed by volunteer doctors and nurses, the clinic provides free health care to those who do not have insurance, or who cannot afford to pay for health care. When the owner of the abortion facility decided to sell in 2013, pro-life activists with Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington raised money to purchase it.

Catholic Diocese of Arlington Bishop Michael Burbidge said that “this is still a leap of faith,” and “it’s faith that allows us to do this.” He also attributed the successful purchase and transformation to prayer. “All those prayers, all those rosaries that you offer… they are never in vain. And God will use them in miraculous ways.” Art Bennett, president and CEO of Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Arlington, called it an example of “loving your neighbor, not just helping your neighbor.”

The clinic currently provides annual physicals, disease management, sick visits, health classes, as well as referrals for other medical services.

Editor’s note. This appeared at LiveAction News and is reposted with permission.