It’s after midnight, and I can’t stop thinking about her.

It’s after midnight, and in a few hours the sun will rise and join the hundreds of thousands of pro-lifers who have traveled to Washington, DC to march in remembrance of the horror that is Roe v Wade at the March for Life.

It’s after midnight, and I can’t stop thinking about her.

I work for National Right to Life, and I think most people would be shocked at the content of the barrage of letters, emails, and packages we receive daily. From requests for one brochure or another to pro-life songs, pro-life poems and a multitude of questions about one of our many programs. But then, occasionally, we receive a letter like hers.

In response to a mass e-mail to college students she wrote:

Dear Pro-Life Stranger,

This is clearly an important issue to you, as it is for me. You see, three years ago, I had an abortion. The decision was incredibly painful, and I fell into a depression that was so severe and lasted over a year. It’s quite difficult to move on when … people around me tell me that I made the wrong decision. However, I would not have been happy or healthy. Currently, I’m in a career that will help hundreds of children. Had I not chosen to abort, hundreds of children would be without an education or a chance at a future.

My heart broke. I paused before continuing and began to imagine the grief, the pain, and even her disappointment – they have become genuine and authentic to me. My heart, a father’s heart, yearned to comfort her and help soothe away the pain. I read on.

Although it was a difficult decision, it was the right one. I will never stop defending a woman’s right to choose. I was not always pro-choice, but as of now I am and, until I have solid evidence that makes me feel otherwise, I will remain pro-choice.

I hope that I have not offended you. I did feel it was necessary to explain why I feel the way I do.

She signed the letter, All the best.

This is what Roe v Wade has wrought: a mindset where it’s preferable to destroy one baby – without regard for the emotional or physical cost to the mother – to further a career. A mindset this young woman believed. How many millions like her are there? How many more walking wounded are there?

These hurting, distraught and pained women are the reason I march today. With each step I take this afternoon I will pray that for the sake of Christ’s sorrowful passion that God may have mercy on them.

It’s after midnight, and I can’t stop thinking about her.