Pro-life Indiana Gov. Mike Pence endorses Ted Cruz

By Dave Andrusko

Pro-Life Indiana Gov. Mike Pence today endorsed pro-life Sen. Ted Cruz

Pro-Life Indiana Gov. Mike Pence today endorsed pro-life Sen. Ted Cruz

Just four days before the crucial Indiana primary, pro-life Gov. Mike Pence today announced his endorsement of pro-life Texas Senator Ted Cruz. The popular governor’s announcement came on Greg Garrison’s radio talk show on 93-WIBC.

Over the last week, Gov. Pence met privately with Sen. Cruz, front runner Donald Trump, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

“I’m not against anybody but I will be voting for Ted Cruz in the upcoming Republican primary,” Pence said. “I see Ted Cruz as a principled conservative who has dedicated his career to [advancing] the Reagan agenda,” he added.

Pence’s announcement came two days after Cruz energized supporters by choosing pro-life former business executive Carly Fiorina to be his vice president.

Cruz supporters believe the back-to- back developments—the choice of a passionately pro-life, articulate woman to be his running mate and the endorsement of the governor of Indiana—could propel Cruz to victory in next Tuesday’s winner take all primary in Indiana in which 57 delegates are at stake.

Last weekend Sen. Cruz and Gov. Kasich agreed that Kasich would not compete in Indiana and Sen. Cruz would not compete in New Mexico or Oregon.

Following Tuesday’s sweep of five states, Trump had increased the total of his delegates to 954, according to RealClearPolitics.com, to 562 delegates for Sen. Cruz.

But the delegate math is much more complicated that these totals would suggest. Referring to “1,237: the number of delegates required for a candidate to win the Republican presidential nomination outright,” CBS News’ Emily Schultheis wrote

The truth is, it’s extraordinarily complicated for a handful of reasons to know who has how many delegates because each state allocates differently — and in many states, the way delegates are allocated and selected isn’t entirely based on the outcome of the state’s primary or caucus.

Further complicating matters is the issue of what happens to delegates won by candidates who have dropped out of the race, like Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. That’s also different based on each state’s rules, and means that at the start of the convention a not-insignificant portion of the available 2,472 delegates will be out of commission for the three remaining candidate.

Pence’s pro-life track record, in Congress and now as the chief executive of Indiana, is well known to pro-lifers.

As NRL News Today reported, last month Pence signed HEA 1337, a comprehensive measure which, among other provisions, protects unborn babies who would be aborted because of a disability or because of their gender (almost always girls).

In his statement, Gov. Pence said

“Throughout my public career, I have stood for the sanctity of life. HEA 1337 is a comprehensive pro-life measure that affirms the value of all human life, which is why I signed it into law today.

“I believe that a society can be judged by how it deals with its most vulnerable—the aged, the infirm, the disabled and the unborn. HEA 1337 will ensure the dignified final treatment of the unborn and prohibits abortions that are based only on the unborn child’s sex, race, color, national origin, ancestry, or disability, including Down syndrome.

“Some of my most precious moments as Governor have been with families of children with disabilities, especially those raising children with Down syndrome. These Hoosiers never fail to inspire me with their compassion and these special children never fail to move me with their love and joy.”