Biden announces he will not run for President in 2016

By Dave Andrusko

Vice President Joe Biden, his wife, Jill Biden, and President Obama in the Rose Garden where Biden announced he would not run for President

Vice President Joe Biden, his wife, Jill Biden, and President Obama in the Rose Garden where Biden announced he would not run for President

By now you’ve probably heard that pro-abortion Vice President Joe Biden said he will not be a candidate for his party’s presidential nomination.

I’m not entirely sure I understood his opening remarks, which were both intensely personal and a brief nuts and bolts explanation of “the process.” However the conclusion of his remarks, made in the White House Rose Garden came early: “Unfortunately I believe we’re out of time, the time necessary to mount a winning campaign for the nomination.” Or, as he put it, the “window” had closed.

Looking ahead to the race that will culmination in November 2016, the most interesting comment was Mr. Biden’s fierce defense of the Obama record. Arguing that the nation (under Obama’s leadership) was on the “cusp of resurgence,” Biden said

This party, our nation would be making a tragic mistake if we walk away or attempt to undo the Obama legacy. …Democrats should not only defend this record and protect this record, they should run on this record.

In plain English, Hillary Clinton should run for Obama’s third term.

Why did Vice President Biden decide against getting in? Surely, the late start could well have played a part. Maybe he was impressed by Mrs. Clinton’s performance in the first debate among Democrats (who gave her a wide berth and barely said a discouraging word). And perhaps the success Clinton experienced this week in a couple of post-debate polls make him think twice…and three times…and…

But it could easily be something Biden has talked about for months: whether his family was ready for the rigors of a presidential campaign so soon after the death of Biden’s son, Beau.

While Biden never officially became a candidate, one candidate who did take part in last week’s debate–former Virginia Senator Jim Webb–has already dropped out. He never caught on with Democrats and his influence always potentially lay elsewhere: running as an Independent, which Webb hinted at when he made his withdrawal announcement.

All of which brings us back to the faceoff between Clinton and Democratic Socialist Senator Bernie Sanders (Vt.)

With Webb out (and potentially others who were on the podium in Las Vegas soon afterwards), the only remaining question in further debates would be whether Sanders continues to treat Clinton with kid gloves.