Blacks, Hispanics continue to have disproportionate number of abortions in NY City, but overall numbers continues to decline

 

By Dave Andrusko

newyorkNY3Hats off to NRLC’s Dr. Randall K. O’Bannon, for his overview of the encouraging results from the CDC showing that the number of abortions in the U.S. have dropped to lows not seen since the earliest days of legal abortion in America as have abortion rates and abortion ratios. (See “CDC Report Confirms Big Abortion Drop.”)

But kudos as well to Michael W. Chapman whose “NYC: 78% of Abortions Were Black and Hispanic Babies” appeared today at CNS News.com. The CDC numbers point in the opposite direction in the Gotham City, illustrating why the city is often referred to as the “Abortion Capital” of the United States.

Chapman explains that according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Blacks make up 25.5% of the population of New York City, and Hispanics comprise 28.6%.

Yet the combined number of abortions for these two populations–59,147—represents an incredible 77.56% of the total number—76,251– of abortions in New York City.

By contrast, whites make up 44% of the city’s population, yet have “only” 12.5% of the number of abortions–9,550 in 2011.

However as strange as it sounds, there may actually be improvement in New York City more recently. How can that be?

For two reasons. As Dr. O’Bannon pointed out, the most recent CDC numbers are for 2011. And the CDC numbers may differ from what the New York City Health Department reports.

Last February NRL News Today reported on the number of abortions for 2012 in New York City.

They had declined to 73,815 while the abortion rate dropped precipitously–from 42.2/1,000 women aged 15-49 in 2011 to 33.4./1,000 in 2012.

Long term (as the New York Post reported earlier this year) that means the abortion rate “has fallen 19 percent since 2003 and 22 percent since 2000, according to the analysis” from the Health Department.

For all the happiness about the trend downward, unfortunately that doesn’t change that the number of abortions in New York City are incredibly high and concentrated in minority neighborhoods.