What follows from being pro-life?

Editor’s note. The following appears on the blog of Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life (MCCL), NRLC’s state affiliate.

From the truth of the pro-life position (i.e., the equal fundamental dignity and right to life of every member of the human family), and the factual reality of abortion (which is widespread and common), euthanasia and embryo-destructive research in American society (as extreme violations of human dignity), what follows about what each of us morally, indeed rationally, ought to do?

Obviously one ought not to have, perform, participate in or encourage an abortion, nor may one support in any way euthanasia, assisted suicide or the destruction of embryonic human beings for research.

But it also seems that we ought to take meaningful steps to help make a difference in light of the sheer gravity and scale of the injustices that are occurring. The role each of us plays will vary and depend upon circumstances, ability and other factors. But like a 19th century American (or Briton) living in an age of human slavery, we ought to do something.

You can find some ideas here. I divide the actions we can take into three broad categories: compassionate assistance (e.g., for the pregnant woman in need who is at risk of abortion), education and persuasion (revealing the truth of human dignity and the reality of abortion, etc.), and political and legislative action (to secure just protection for those who are now unprotected, and to save lives).

Even a single human life matters. So does a single changed mind, or a single touched heart.

As philosopher William Lane Craig writes, our pro-life position “is a philosophically and scientifically informed ethical concern” — a fact I tend to emphasize on this blog. “But there’s a better word for it,” notes Craig. “It’s called compassion. God help us if our hearts have grown so cold that we cannot weep for these little ones who perish daily by the thousands.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.