Did pro-abortionists Democrats learn from 2016 or are they inflating last Tuesday’s results?

By Dave Andrusko

Hillary Clinton paused while speaking during a rally at the Grand Valley State University Fieldhouse in Allendale, Michigan, on Nov. 7, 2016. (Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty Images)

Hillary Clinton paused while speaking during a rally at the Grand Valley State University Fieldhouse in Allendale, Michigan, on Nov. 7, 2016. (Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s our last NRL News Today post of the week. “One year later, Democrats try to use painful lessons of 2016 to guide future campaigns” stands in stark contrast to all the gleeful stories in which pro-abortion Democrats tell themselves that Tuesday’s sweep of the statewide offices in Virginia means happy days are here again.

Evan Halper and David Lauter wrote the story for the Los Angeles Times and while the political “autopsies” it surveys often are spot on, they are still locked in a way of thinking that overinflates Democratic strength beyond their coastal strongholds and all but writes off President Trump.

Two quick points. First, in the story many leading Democratic strategists bemoan their mistakes and miscalculations, which, when added to the dysfunctionality of the Hillary Clinton campaign whose New York headquarters was completely out of sync with the people who were running the campaign in the states, helps explains her very unexpected loss.

“Donnie Fowler, the political strategist and Silicon Valley technologist who ran the Democratic National Committee’s get-out-the-vote operation for Clinton, is still haunted by last year,” Halper and Lauter write. “Fowler’s autopsy of the loss has been a must-read for Democrats. Among other things, he found that the campaign was so confident of its computer model showing an impenetrable blue wall of support in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania that it disregarded pleas from organizers in those states to send more resources.”

Second, we read, “Democrats are pivoting their strategies as research from the Center [for American Progress, a liberal research and activist group] and others shows that the white, working-class vote is larger and more influential than the party’s operatives seemed to accept during the campaign. Whites without a college education made up 45% of the vote last year, the center’s analysis estimates, a considerably larger share than indicated by exit polls.”

Smart, right? But if you’ve paid even passing attention to the tone of their answers, it’s impossible to miss that these Democrats are so scornful of President Trump you wonder if they will tell themselves that the core constituencies which accounted for his victories in places like Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania can be once again ignored, and/or taken for granted.

An interesting read. But I’m guessing a year from now, Halper and Lauter will be writing a very different narrative.