Pro-abortion Kaine chooses to be blind to the truly “least of these,” the unborn child

By Dave Andrusko

Pro-abortion Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

Pro-abortion Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.)

I suppose it is only to state the obvious that a writer will gear his argument, his rhetoric, and the volume with which he makes his pitch depending on the audience he is trying to sway.

So when pro-abortion Senator Tim Kaine (D-Va.), who is running for re-election in 2018, writes an essay for Christianity Today the vitriol with which he and his party lambast Republicans and particularly President Trump is conspicuous by its absence. Indeed, when talking about the future of the fight over Obamacare, Kaine writes about “find[ing] these solutions by bringing together different perspectives”– how “No one person or party has all the answers, so we cannot say to the other side ‘I don’t need you.’

To reinforce this point, Kaine benevolently adds, “Our disagreements do not lie in whether to care for them, but how.”

Going for broke, Kaine calls in the heavy artillery. He quotes the Apostle Paul’s explanation/admonition to a quarreling church in Corinth where Paul “compared a church with many members to a body with many parts.” None is more important than any other.

Is this the same we-are-all-in-this-together fellow who recently told POLITICO

Trump “has frequently done things that I think are shocking for a president to do, but nothing he’s done has been surprising,” Kaine says. “There is nothing this guy has done that should surprise a person in this country based on the person he was before he took the oath of office.”

Of course, pro-lifers know Kaine as the have-it-both-ways “personally opposed” Democrat who signed on as Hillary Clinton’s vice president and pledged his unfailing support for her full abortion-on-demand agenda. That included her fervent desire to obliterate the Hyde Amendment, credited with saving two million lives, which Kaine had said he supported.

So is this the same Tim Kaine (with a 100% pro-abortion voting record) who starts his Christianity Today essay by quoting from Matthew 25 where Jesus talks of the time when the Son of Man will judge the nations? Where the sheep will be separated from the goats based on their response to Jesus–that is to say, how they/we treat “the least of these”?

Of course, Kaine knows the hypocrisy. He has chosen political expediency over what his faith and his reason both tell him: who is more “the least of these” than the unborn child?