What the worldwide support for Charlie Gard tells us

By Dave Andrusko

Before the day is over we will have posted at least three stories about today’s hearing which could seal the fate of little Charlie Gard or offer a morsel of hope that UK High Court Judge Nicholas Francis is the least bit open to the argument that Charlie can benefit from going to the United States to receive what is called nucleoside therapy.

Let me just offer a brief post about something that struck me as I looked (as I always do) at This Day in History.

As you know, Connie Yates and Chris Gard establish a Gofundme page on Facebook with a goal of raising something north of $1 million dollars to help defray the costs of moving Charlie. Nearly 85,000 people from the UK and abroad, have pledged money and the total is at least $1.7 million–and growing!

True, the fight to save Charlie did not become highly publicized worldwide until Pope Francis and President Trump tweeted their support for the family. But that does change that the campaign to raise money for Charlie is a genuine grassroots groundswell, unlike, say, the Live Aid concert that took place on July 13, 1985, “a worldwide rock concert organized to raise money for the relief of famine-stricken Africans.”

That noble, grand “superconcert,” which featured many of the premier rockers of the day, is/was to be commended in the highest terms possible. It raised a whopping $125 million for a cause of surpassing importance.

If you recall, Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana officially opened Live Aid at Wembley Stadium in London.

I fully understand that literally millions of lives were at stake in Africa, which helps explain why Live Aid was so successful (and because of the work of Bob Geldof, who was a singer for a then well-known Irish rock group).

But Charlie’s one life is hugely important as well. That people all over the globe have rallied to his side tells us they understand the importance of that truth.