Kansas Ex-abortionist Neuhaus sets up second “fund-me” appeal

By Kathy Ostrowski, Legislative Director, Kansans for Life

Kansas abortionist Kris Neuhaus (AP Photo/John Hanna, File)

Kansas abortionist Kris Neuhaus
(AP Photo/John Hanna, File)

Ex-Kansas abortionist Kris Neuhaus wants your pity (she sees herself as a martyr) and your money.

In a radio interview Thursday, Neuhaus elaborated that she has lost her research job “without explanation” and has initiated a second online “fund me“ campaign to raise $100,000.

So who is Kris Neuhaus? A failed abortionist whom NRL News Today readers will remember had her medical license revoked in July 2012. She appealed to a friendly judge and her case was remanded to the State Board of Healing Arts in March 2014. The Board revoked the license again this past January on the narrower complaint of record-keeping failure. She is now appealing that revocation. (More about that below.)

Fed by adulation from multiple pro-abortion outlets where she has been termed a “hero-provider,” Neuhaus now insists (as she did in a press conference in April) that she be referred to as Dr. Neuhaus. She bills herself as “the first woman physician in Kansas to publicly provide abortion care, performing or consulting on over 10,000 procedures.”

In Thursday’s radio interview Neuhaus said she is seeking public funding to help her afford the filing fees required to apply for medical licenses in other states. (Watch out, America!)

However, in several outlets, including Mother Jones magazine, Neuhaus had promised she will never again do abortions, and says she has attained a Master’s degree in Public Health at the University of Kansas. So why is she not employable? No answer to that.

This is Neuhaus’s second online campaign. Eighteen months ago she raised $63,000, ostensibly to be used to save her home and pay her legal fees to the Board, at that time billed at $93,000.

But she has paid nothing to the Board and is protesting the reassessed costs of $31,000 she now owes.

Her husband is running another donation site to repay her attorneys for their pro bono work on her behalf.

Neuhaus believes she deserves public support “to enable me to continue to oppose the dire state of women’s health care in Kansas, and to help expose the right-wing’s attempt to export this insanity to other states.”

Note, first, that Neuhaus is suggesting she will export herself to other states. Note also that while Neuhaus touts herself as a martyr who lost her medical license unjustly in the pro-life administration of Gov. Sam Brownback due to her “affiliation with Dr. Tiller,” in fact, Neuhaus was charged in 2009— during the administration of pro-abortion Gov. Kathleen Sebelius.

What really happened?

As I have detailed in previous posts, Neuhaus was charged with rubber-stamping post-viability abortions over a period of seven years at the Wichita abortion clinic of the late George Tiller. The role Neuhaus was supposed to play under the law was that of an independent “check” on post-viability abortions by providing bona fide second opinions on maternal health.

Tiller testified under oath that he was connected to a financially desperate Neuhaus who was willing to provide the legally required mental health referrals using an online “Psych-Lite” diagnostic tool. (Neuhaus was never trained as a psychiatric consultant.)

The state Healing Arts Board of Kansas charged Neuhaus with improperly evaluating those vulnerable girls and breaking state regulations requiring a proper health record for each patient. After extensive hearings by Administrative Law Judge Edward Gashler, the final order of revocation against her license was issued in July 2012 for “professional incompetence” and “failing to meet minimum requirements for maintaining records.”

Neuhaus appealed the order to district court Judge Theis. In March 2014, Theis overturned the Board’s revocation, concluding it was too “harsh” a penalty for Neuhaus’ atrocious record-keeping. Theis also disagreed with the finding of incompetence and ordered another review by the Board.

This past January, the Board issued a second revocation against Neuhaus on the single issue of incomplete medical files for those 11 teens. This was her “third strike” said the Board; she had been cited in past years for improper patient documentation and had violated her legal stipulation to amend her ways.

The Board order characterized her as stubborn and “incapable of successful rehabilitation,” and assessed legal costs at just under $31,000.

But in March Neuhaus petitioned Judge Theis to again block the Board’s revocation and dismiss the legal expenses.