“Girls” Star stars in pro-abortion PSA

By Dave Andrusko

Jemima Kirke

Jemima Kirke

At first I wasn’t going to write about Jemima Kirke, one of the stars of “Girls,” who has filmed a new PSA (as in Public Service Announcement) for the Center for Reproductive Rights. It’s part of the CRR’s “Draw the Line” campaign where celebrities talk about their abortions. It’s the whole we-have-to-destigmatize-abortion shtick. But then I watched the video.

Besides her fame as “Jenna” who is (as one highly sympathetic story explained) “a free-spirited, sometimes painfully selfish character who does what she pleases,” why has this particular PSA generated a fair amount of attention?

Because, Kirke tells us, she was a college student in 2007 and she could barely scrape up enough money to scrape out her unborn baby. [1] In fact, even after cleaning out her checkbook and getting some money from her boyfriend, she was short. What to do?

She had the abortion without anesthesia!

(We learn she had her abortion at the local Planned Parenthood. Apparently, if she couldn’t pay the full freight, the wonderful folks at PPFA would allow her to abort without anesthesia. How did that backhanded admission slip by CRR?)

How could that be when Kirke comes from a family with money? “Because I couldn’t tell my mother I was pregnant, I had to pay for it out of pocket.”

She adds, “It’s these obstacles and it’s this stigma that makes these things not completely unavailable – and that’s the tricky part is that we think… we do have free choice and we are able to do whatever we want but then there are these little hoops we have to jump through to get them.”

So this PSA pulls quadruple duty.

We’re instructed it’s an obstacle that someone else doesn’t pay for her abortion; good thing she didn’t have to tell her parents/mother; stigma is bad, which, along with having to pay to “terminate” your kid, proves that women don’t really have “free choice”; and (as she emphasizes more than once) “I’ve always felt that reproductive issues are something that women should be able to talk about freely, especially amongst each other.”

Two other quick points. First, being aborted was, of course, in the baby’s best interests.

“I wasn’t sure that I wanted to be attached to this person for the rest of my life,” she says, a reference to the then-boyfriend and unwittingly to their baby. “My life just was not conducive to raising a healthy, happy child. I just didn’t feel it was fair.” But it was fair to end the child’s life.

Second, when you read the passel of isn’t-she-brave stories, you almost always read about the “haters.” That, of course, refers to anyone who disagrees with Kirke.

I strongly disagree with Kirke, but I don’t hate her or any other woman who aborts.

What I do hate is the shedding of innocent blood.

This “PSA” can be viewed here.

[1] We’ll assume for the sake of discussion this is true, bearing in mind that when something is too good to be true–in this case from the pro-abortion advocate’s point of view–it usually isn’t.